Does Never Really Mean Never?

I’m totally writing this against my better judgement. Seriously, I know the whole Creative Cloud fury has died down and I must be dumb for even bringing this up. But I’m truly curious to see your thoughts and I’m hoping/trusting that you can keep it from turning into another bash-fest against the Creative Cloud. So…here’s an interesting thought, question, topic, whatever you want to call it. I had a discussion with some one the other day and they asked if I was going to start teaching more on Photoshop Elements. Don’t get me wrong. I love Elements and recommend it daily to people. But I asked why. They said that it seemed natural because so many people are upset about this whole Adobe Creative Cloud subscription thing – and that Elements seemed like the program they would migrate to. It got me thinking about the future of post-processing and where some of the hangups now are.

1) Many people don’t like Adobe’s Subscription model for Photoshop and have said they will NEVER “rent” or subscribe to get their software.

2) Many people (many of the same people from #1 above) have said that they’ll find a Photoshop alternative (like maybe Elements or one of the 3rd party plug-ins). In other words, they’ll stop using Photoshop and start using another program that does something similar.

So here’s what got me thinking. For starters, I have to tell you a story about AT&T and something that happened to me 10+ years ago. See, I moved and had an AT&T contract for my phone. Well, where I moved had horrible cell reception. I called AT&T and because of the distance of the closest tower and what they considered to be “acceptable” reception, they wouldn’t do anything. Wouldn’t even let me out of my 2 year contract. So if I wanted to be able to use my phone at my house, I was given no choice but to cancel my contract and pay the contract cancellation fee. They offered me nothing else. I was pissed! Livid! I swore I’d “NEVER EVER… EVER” use AT&T again.

Fast forward to about 5-6 years ago when the iPhone came out. I wanted one. And you know the only place I could go to get it? Yup. AT&T. So my “never ever ever” turned in to “I’ll never use AT&T… EVER…until they have something I really want”. I signed back up with them and have been a happy customer ever since.

So I wonder if this dislike (okay, hatred) for the Creative Cloud subscription will ever be like that for some people? I mean, it’s easy to say I’ll NEVER subscribe. But what happens when some killer feature comes out in Photoshop (or some other Adobe app or even a whole new app). Does it change anything? I know that some people will hold their ground on principle alone. But I have to believe that some people will eventually subscribe.

Here’s something else to think about. In all markets (not just photography), the so-called “Pros” tend to lead the trends right? It happens in golf, tennis, football, heck even in popular cooking shows on tv. We see some big-name golfer using a certain set of golf clubs and we go out and buy those clubs (or golf balls, or gloves, or tennis racquets, or pots and pans from your favorite cooking show… you get the idea). So is the photography/post-processing market any different? What’s going to happen when the latest version of Photoshop CC starts to outgrow previous versions (CS6 or CS5) and there’s a bigger gap? It’s not a huge deal right now if I teach with Photoshop CC and you still have CS6 because the features are nearly identical. But what happens in two or three years when more and more features get added to Photoshop CC? Should I do every tutorial with “Here’s how to do it in Photoshop CC… and here’s how to do it in CS6… and here’s how to do it in CS5″? I mean, would you expect Joe McNally to show everything he does with a Nikon D3 and then show it with a Nikon D4? No, of course not. Could Joe take a great photo with the D3? Yup. Just like the golf pro can shoot under par with clubs he had 15 years ago. But they’ve upgraded to the newer stuff because, as a pro, it made sense for them. We, as people who follow them, want to see how they do it now and what tools they use. Not how they would do it if they were using older tools. Photoshop is a pro’s tool. The pro’s will continue to use the newest version. What’s this mean for people who want to follow and learn what they do?

Okay, so you can say that some one else will come up with a Photoshop competitor/alternative. I’d say they already exist (onOne, Nik?). And I bet more will come. I’d bet more companies are now working on that as their mission, than there were 3 months ago. But this stuff takes time. First, they have to develop the software. Then, as I mentioned above, they have to get the pros on board and get them to drop Photoshop. But we already talked about this… the pros don’t have a reason to drop Photoshop CC because the cloud makes sense for them. See the cycle here? Plus, this all takes time. And I have no idea if it will all really happen. But I can tell you that we’d have to be years away from it.

Anyway, it’s just something to think about. Does Never Really Mean Never? And please don’t leave your thoughts on subscription models here. We already know that nobody likes it. I know many of you reading this say you’ll never ever “rent” your software. Is your “never ever” a guaranteed lock and you won’t budge no matter what? Or is your “never ever” like my sworn enemy of AT&T? :) I mean, once things simmer down and the dust settles. You have to imagine that Adobe is working on a good (and affordable) subscription model for photographers. Once that happens (and the right price makes sense for you), does all of this anger subside, or are you going to be a GIMP user for life ;)
(FYI… GIMP is a freely distributed image editing program that’s been around for many years)

NOTE: Folks, peeps, my homies… PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don’t turn this in to another comment stream on how you hate cloud subscription services. I know. I get it. I’ve heard it. That’s not the point here and we all already know how it turns out. This is more of a story of something that happened to me and something I’ve been thinking about. If you leave a comment then try to keep it geared to the questions/thoughts posed at the end of the post. Thanks :)

  • Lonnie Ross Dillon

    The problem with CC is that it assumes that I can afford to upgrade every version because that’s the only way the cost model makes sense. First, I always skip versions, partly because the upgrades are less “wow” to me and because it’s too expensive. The other big reason is if I do find myself in financial straights and can’t afford the subscription even briefly, I lose all access to the software. Never means never…unless Adobe can work in a perpetual license model in there somewhere.

  • Chris

    You are a very brave man Matt, revisiting this very controversial subject.

    • http://www.mattk.com/ Matt Kloskowski

      Ha! You’re right Chris! And I’m not normally the controversial writer. I’d rather talk photography, lightroom and photoshop and keep it light hearted. But I honestly did wonder about this. Luckily, most people kept it from becoming too much of a bash-fest and answered the question I was wondering so all is well.

      • Chris

        Well Matt, I’m sorry to say that I’m going to be a Never person. I don’t see the value in subscribing for many years, outlaying thousands of dollars and then ending up with nothing if my financial position makes it impossible to continue the subscription.

        • Stan Burman

          Bingo!

      • Bp

        So Matt what is your reaction or comment with those who have responded…there still seems like a lot negative heat. I proposed this to Scott K.:Can you as part of NAPP but a “team discount” from adobe and pass on the savings if any to those who join your organization?

        My opinion if the price were a lot lower($10 to $20 perpetually fixed price for the whole suite) especially for us customers who’ve been with adobe for 15 plus years id give it some thought

  • Paul Collingridge

    Great wisdom, from Matty K, the photo-sage. They don’t use the epithet “Guru” for no reason when describing you. Many of us need very little more than LR for the bulk of what we do, but we *do* need that extra something (maybe text, maybe layers, maybe better healing). Once we know what we want we can explore the choices and decide on what we are prepared to pay. Maybe the uproar is because, just like the amateurs who love to buy D800′s and D4′s, too many photographers have defaulted to “the best” (there is little doubt that PSCC is the best all round). I’m sure you are right, as our photography grows & matures, or our profits rise & fall and our ambition changes we need to revisit our old choices. The old adage “Look before you leap” still applies wherever along the journey we are. If PS was a static, never evolving product then life would be easy, but PS changes with the industry & the state of photography, and so do I. Maybe other products will evolve along the same road as me; so I plan to keep my options open….. I’m just beginning to explore video, if that takes off it is another opportunity to stop and look before I leap. Have a good day!

  • Bob

    In my day job, I am a consultant and train people about quality
    and the customer experience. Adobe has
    the right to change their business model any time they choose. What they don’t
    have a right to expect is that their customers will like their decisions. “Customer
    Experience” is something that best-in-class companies shoot for in their
    business model. The reasons are obvious.
    Have a great product and make it easy for your customers to do business with
    you (this includes such things as pricing, quality, warranty) and people will
    come flocking to your doors. The Photoshop business model at Adobe was not
    broken. Customers were not beating on their doors to develop a new model. Economic reasons drove Adobe’s decision.

    I value my relationships with great suppliers. I am dedicated to my suppliers and spend my
    time and money investing in them. I have been a happy, long time, (since Version
    2 in 1991 with upgrades every 18 months) satisfied buyer of Adobe products
    until now. Until Adobe fixes this bad
    Customer Experience, I will no longer support them in word or action.

    At least I now have a current example to use in my classes
    of what not to do if having an excellent customer experience is your goal. I promise to use it in every class.

  • Tomislav

    Matt,

    not directly a comment but I was hoping that you could maybe shed some light for me on the situation with the prices.

    As far as I understand now with the CC you download Adobes software directly from their servers and you get no box, no DVD. You simply download it directly from the servers. And it is probably the same server no matter from where are you downloading it, be it USA, Europe, Japan…

    But how come that exactly the same product, delivered in same manner, from same place costs 69$/mo per user (team license) and in Croatia it costs around 114$/mo?

    Even without taxes price is around 91$/mo.

    Do you maybe have some info why I wouldn’t be able to buy license directly from Adobe and thus get the software considerably cheaper?

    For companies it maybe makes sense to buy it from an authorized reseller for some tax exemption but for some amateur photographer not really.

    Regards,
    Tomislav

    • Tomislav

      After chatting with Adobe support and emails from authorized reseller for Adobe here in Croatia I found out that currently I can only buy Team licenses for CC and that for 114$/mo and I have to pay for the whole year up front (around 1360 $). So being an amateur CC is off my list in foreseeable future.

  • Steven Booker

    I will never subscribe to CC.
    Yes, for me never was about 2 months.
    I subscribed and all is well.

  • Christopher Eaton

    As a professional, never probably means someday with CC, but I won’t like it; so, for now, CS6 is fine. But, I think I can say never if other software companies jump on the bandwagon and try to rent us the software (and, let’s be honest, that is what it is… rent). How many times a month can we be dinged a fee? We would be nickled and dimed out of business as the rent adds up; and, the enthusiast photographer would just plain go elsewhere (as many of them are).

    You make a good point on what the pros will do and how long it would likely take most competitors to build a Photoshop killer… But, Adobe should never say never about a competitor knocking them off their throne, at least in the photography world. For example, if Nik + Google choose to take a large segment of the photography software market, Google has the resources to build a Photoshop killer faster than most… especially, if they focus in the beginning only on what photographers need and forget about all the features that designers and illustrators need (they can get that segment with version 2 or 3).

    So, I cannot say never ever, but neither should Adobe… the CC model has put them in a precarious position where they are now a potential big target and a lot of people wanting to take a shot.

  • Stan Burman

    Adobe has become the Darth Vader of image editing. I don’t see how they could ever regain my trust. There are alternatives. And it’s difficult to believe that a company could do such a splendid job of antagonizing its customers. I, for one, don’t believe that I’ll be going to “the other side.”

  • Chris Seubert

    I will admit that I’m an amateur at best, and CS6 was the first full blown PS that I ever got. That was probably 6 months ago and I think I’ve used it less than 10 times, and most of that was just because I wanted to, not because I needed to. I am in no way against subscription models, but at this time, CC makes no sense for me from a financial point of view. I actually DO think I would go to Elements if for some reason CS6 dies or if Elements gets some sort of killer feature.

    As for training, the reality is, people can figure out these programs on their own, especially if they are doing simple touch-ups like most amateurs are doing. While it may make life easier and faster, it is not something that is requires for the bulk of people that use and edit photos today.

  • Nick Marzinski

    The day after Adobe announced, I pounded out my thoughts on the whole CC thing (which can be found here: http://bit.ly/13Ip3pk) and my views since that posting haven’t changed. The short version: Right now, never means “I’ll wait and see what Adobe (or another suiter) comes up with.” I’ve never been big on early adoption (still don’t own a smartphone, in fact), so jumping on board just to have the latest and greatest isn’t a compelling reason for me. In the meantime, my copy of CS6 meets my needs.

  • Robert Qvist

    I said to myself a couple years ago that I would NEVER EVER buy an android phone because I love the iOS and the iPhone… and today I own a Galaxy Nexus which I LOVE! So, everyone can chance ;-) As for the CC subscription… I think it’s a really great thing but I also think that it’s a lot of money for an unemployed guy like me :-( But soon!!

  • Gavin Isaacs

    I was not overly impressed with Adobe’s new business model, but never rushed into any final opinion. I think never is a long time. While I think the new CC is great for those who don’t own Photoshop and for users of the entire range of products. It pretty much sucks in terms of value for CS6 owners and photographers that do not make a income from photography. For me the $10 deal for a year is a slap in the face. I use LR 4.4 and CS6. There are no features in CC that I need or want. So I will wait and see. If Adobe would offer a fair priced deal I will considerate when the time comes. In a year or two who knows what might be available. So in effect my main disappointment is that Adobe has found a way to increase the cost of CC by 20-30%, all wrapped up in creative marketing.

  • Moises Cruz

    If Adobe thinks they will make more money from ( like you put it ) PROs more power to them. Realistically consumer out purchase Photoshop software than PROs. You surround yourself with other “PROs” rubbing elbows. Blowing smoke up each others butts thinking everyone else is on the elitist boat like you. It’s AMAZING how the photography industry have become hustlers, product pimps. Nickle and dime here nickle and dime there. How can you look in your childrens eyes and not be concerned with KARMA ???? One thing I know Matt KARMA always gets us where we least expect and where it hurts the most…..

  • pompanonic

    Not me or most of the pro I know in fact of allthe newspapers who supply photoshop are still using CS4…I got CS6 but it will be the last one…I really am enjoying LR5 and all the plugins for it….people in the photojournalism business do not need layers and all the other things the photoshop can do for you…I wa nice to stay ahead of the game and say you had the latest….but LR has taken over for me…thanks for all you do..

  • Karl Rottmann

    As an enthusiast I’ve never been able to justify spending 1k+ on Photoshop CS6, 20$/month allows me to always stay current not have to worry about spending 1k unexpectedly. I figure many people are upset because this change to CC eliminates piracy. I hope that CC enable Adobe for more innovation. I’m looking forward to lower prices as people realize it is not a big deal and join more. I would like to see a Photoshop+LR $25/month bundle. No brainer for me.

  • Shawn T. Moore

    Pixelmator (not bad for 20$) it hit a half million downloads the first week adobe announced the Adobe CC subscription service. Photoshop has been the only real answer for pros for 20+ years and that’s been quite a run for a software company. While me like many were angered by the subscription plan, I will subscribe because work pays for it. I think it’s different for many Napp member’s because many are advanced amateurs and it is a monthly luxury. I am sure as soon as some alternative come close PSD many will bail on PSD. I don’t think Adobe is the loved company they were a year ago.

    We use to get so excited about the next version of Photoshop. No one is excited this time around. And the new CC feature are not as groundbreaking as in previous releases.

    Old dinosaurs rarely see their extinction coming!

    I am still annoyed at Adobe but no longer Angry.

    Have you seen the Petition on Change.org

    http://goo.gl/c15c2

  • Guest

    For me there was never, a
    “never.”

    While I am an experienced albeit amateur / hobbyist visual
    artist, photographer, designer (Graphics Design pay the bills -
    photography my passion) -
    with that familiar dream of making it to
    the Pros on my own (or a field related office in Oldsmar. I never really understood the extreme
    views and hateful narrative one way or the blind Adobe support the other
    way. I
    think I’m falling into the old debate by continuing. While I
    genuinely do admire those that take a stand
    for moral / ethical reasons as well as
    sympathy for those that would like to subscribe to CC but
    can’t afford the subscription fee as their budget allows
    for perhaps an every other release upgrade cycle – the reality is that Adobe has
    many times more Photoshop users
    because of CC and the subscription based service.
    Adobe’s common stock value on August 2, 2012 was $30.58 a share – August 2,
    2013 it is 47.45 – Adobe is not losing
    money with it’s subscription plan – it’s a tried
    and true formula almost (Almost) like the give
    away the razor, sell the blades mantra.
    Subscription plans simply work for the masses.
    (btw; No, I don’t own Adobe stock – but wish I
    had 2 years ago! I digress.)
    But… A few points from my humble world; I
    have friends with hobbies and leisure time activities
    ranging from Moto-Cross, Mountain Climbing, Downhill Skiing,
    Music Collecting, Attending Yankees home games every season (ok, he’s not well
    – ;-> ), “Theater Night,” etc., etc.
    Now having only dabbled in a few of those activities – I
    have no idea what it costs a year, but having gone to a few
    – the gas to the event and home covered 1 month of a full Adobe CC membership. So, as
    mentioned – my hobby as a photographer is not going to
    die and I am fond of Adobe software and integration of
    their suite. That doesn’t mean I wouldn’t
    buy the better mousetrap if it came along. But for me,
    right now, Adobe Apps are fun, my hobby and
    potentially a future, supplemental source of income. Fact is, I spent far more on film and
    processing 9 years ago than I do now with digital
    files and digital processing while yielding far more
    control over my own shots, far better
    and far more numerous “keepers.” So,
    again – for me the cost is easily justified, even
    as a hobbyist.

    Heck, Just Friday (8/2/13) I spent $79 bucks for a seminar ticket, $24
    bucks on gas, $11 bucks for parking, $18 bucks on Starbucks coffee and a
    sandwich and $8 bucks for a quick “dinner”
    at Mc’ds (although the price is much
    higher, I can’t measure that in monetary units) -
    all to see Matt Kloskowski in
    Hartford, CT to teach Lightoom, a program which
    I know quiet well, BUT, still
    learned some great tips and features! Alt/Opt on White/Black to see first
    incidence of white/black in an image…
    How did I miss that? And, got to enjoy
    some time indulging my hobby with a
    parting fist bump
    from Matt! The day was a blast and
    the attendees were all murmuring
    about Lr and what they learned in such quick fashion.
    There’s a point in there somewhere.

    Thanks so much
    Matt! It was
    an educational, insightful
    fun day!

    …I told my Mom I would
    never do a lot of things in the past, with the exception
    of my boycott of liver and onions after the dinner table
    incident of 1979 – I’ve rescinded many “Never’s” ;-)
    Now, maybe tonight I’ll “rent” 1 2 hour long movie on demand to relax -
    sure beats the days when I used to go buy a VHS for $50.00 to watch
    once… Well until Blockbuster hit the scene back in the day allowing
    the flexibility of renting! ;-)

  • Doug Evans

    For me there was never, a “never.”

    While I am an experienced albeit amateur / hobbyist visual artist, photographer, designer (Graphics Design pay the bills – photography my passion) – with that familiar dream of making it to the Pros on my own (or a field related office in Oldsmar!) ;-) I really did not understand the extreme views and harsh narrative one way or the blind Adobe support the other way. I think I’m falling into the old debate by continuing. While I genuinely do admire those that take a stand for moral / ethical reasons as well as sympathy for those that would like to subscribe to CC but can’t afford the subscription fee as their budget allows for perhaps an every other release upgrade cycle – the reality is that Adobe has many times more Photoshop users because of CC and the subscription based service. Adobe’s common stock value on August 2, 2012 was $30.58 a share – August 2, 2013 it is $47.45 – Adobe is not losing money with it’s subscription plan – it’s a tried and true formula almost (Almost) like the give away the razor, sell the blades mantra. Subscription plans simply work for the masses. (btw; No, I don’t own Adobe stock – but wish I had 2 years ago! I digress.) But… A few points from my humble world; I have friends with hobbies and leisure time activities ranging from Moto-Cross, Mountain Climbing, Downhill Skiing, Music Collecting, Attending Yankees home games every season (ok, he’s not well – ;-> ), “Theater Night,” etc., etc. Now having only dabbled in a few of those activities – I have no idea what it costs a year, but having gone to a few – the gas to the event and home covered 1 month of a full Adobe CC membership. So, as mentioned – my hobby as a photographer is not going to die and I am fond of Adobe software and integration of their suite. That doesn’t mean I wouldn’t buy the better mousetrap if it came along. But for me, right now, Adobe Apps are fun, my hobby and potentially a future, supplemental source of income. Fact is, I spent far more on film and processing 9 years ago than I do now with digital files and digital processing while yielding far more control over my own shots, far better and far more numerous “keepers.” So, again – for me the cost is easily justified, even as a hobbyist.

    Heck, Just Friday (02Aug13) I spent $79 bucks for a seminar ticket, $24 bucks on gas, $11 bucks for parking, $18 bucks on Starbucks coffee and a sandwich and $8 bucks for a quick “dinner” at Mc’ds (although the price is much higher, I can’t measure that in monetary units) – all to see Matt Kloskowski in Hartford, CT to teach Lightoom, a program which I know quiet well, BUT, still learned some great tips and features! Alt/Opt on White/Black to see first incidence of white/black in an image… How did I miss that? And, got to enjoy some time indulging my hobby with a parting fist bump from Matt! The day was a blast and the attendees were all murmuring about Lr and what they learned in such quick fashion. There’s a point in there somewhere.

    Thanks so much Matt! It was an educational, insightful fun day… Surprised how fast it went by!

    …I told my Mom I would never do a lot of things in the past, with the exception of my boycott of liver and onions after the dinner table incident of 1979 – I’ve rescinded many “Never’s” ;-) Now, maybe tonight I’ll “rent” 1 2 hour long movie on demand to relax – sure beats the days when I used to go buy a VHS for $50.00 to watch once… Well until Blockbuster hit the scene back in the day allowing the flexibility of renting! ;-)

    • Bp

      Yes but here is something interesting:

      Adobe CFO Mike Garrett and Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen dumps Adobe stock!

      Adobe Systems Inc. ( ADBE ): EVP, CFO and Assistant Secretary Mark Garrett Sold 232,276 Shares

      EVP, CFO and Assistant Secretary Mark Garrett sold 232,276 shares of ADBE stock on 06/21/2013 at the average price of $44.95. Mark Garrett owns at least 117,847 shares after this. The price of the stock has decreased by 0.4% since.

      Adobe Systems Inc was originally incorporated in California in October 1983 and was reincorporated in Delaware in May 1997. Adobe Systems Inc has a market cap of $22.53 billion; its shares were traded at around $44.77 with a P/E ratio of 31.75 and P/S ratio of 5.33. Adobe Systems Inc had an annual average earnings growth of 13.8% over the past 10 years. GuruFocus rated Adobe Systems Inc the business predictability rank of 3.5-star .

      Adobe Systems Inc. reported second quarter 2013 income of $76.5 million ($0.15 per share), compared to $223.9 million ($0.45 per share) in the prior year quarter. Second quarter revenue was $1.01 billion, down from the $1.12 billion reported last year.

      President and CEO Shantanu Narayen sold 50,000 shares of ADBE stock on 06/20/2013 at the average price of $44.85.

      Read more: http://www.nasdaq.com/article/

  • Anto de Chav

    Sunny skies only.. no clouds for me…

    Adobe is being greedy..

  • MarkJH

    I question Matt’s premise that most professionals gravitate to cutting-edge tools or technology.

    Of course there are a few big names that undoubtably do; but these artists tend to be sponsored, no? I’m sure McNally loves the latest Nikon gear and would use it regardless, but it can’t hurt that Nikon also pays him to do so.

    The professional artists I know tend to be less interested in the latest technology or gear, in of itself, and more interested in the latest processes or results. They’re not interested in shooting a D4 or buying Adobe CC per se; they’re interested in producing original, interesting, innovative work *however* it gets done. Sometimes that might involve the latest technology, but just as often (more often?) it doesn’t.

    Also, if they find something that “works”, something that really defines their style in an original, marketable direction, they stick with it.

    As an example of these two forces at work, consider the hotness of film photography right now in some markets. Folks talking technology on blogs like this can barely remember the “film era,” but if you go to WPPI or have read any style / fashion / bridal print in the past five years, you can’t avoid guys like Jose Villa, who are getting published everywhere and shooting gorgeous, original, stunning five-figure wedding commissions with fifteen year-old Contax 645s, Fuji pro 400H, and Fuji Frontier scanners from the 80s. Adobe’s latest tech just doesn’t figure much into those workflows; but in terms of creative style, they very much define the “cutting edge.”

    So if you ask me, this Adobe’s real problem. Creative professionals follow art, not technology. They’re interested in results, not tools, and they find interesting means to push the state of the art that aren’t necessarily aligned with Adobe’s corporate interests or feature release schedule. Folks who really follow the pros follow the style; the tools they buy derive from that. It’s not “I shoot Nikon because McNally does.” It’s “I shoot Nikon because I want to use McNally’s workflow to get similar results.”

    I guess my non-judgmental, moderate message to Adobe might be this: underestimate or condescend to creative people at your peril. It only takes one innovative portfolio, one amazing ad campaign, one viral photograph to spin the whole industry’s momentum in completely unprecedented directions.

    And Matt, if you’re thinking about what to teach in the future, that’d be my suggestion to you: follow or define original style trends and talk about how they’re done, regardless whether Adobe sponsors the tool set.

  • Danelle J

    Matt, When I say I “never” will go to a particular vendor or buy a particular product, I mean it. There have been several companies that I will never deal with again. There are products I will never purchase again. I meant it and I mean it!

    There are thousands of people who can not or will not go to the cloud… they mean it! I mean it! I will never go to the cloud and pay a subscription fee every month.

    You and lots of other “teachers” make your money helping, guiding, tutoring, inspiring and showing thousands and thousands of non-pro photographers to improve and enjoy photography and making our photos something that we can be proud of.

    You are smart and, YES, you should remember all of the rest of us non-pro non-cloud users and still educate and inspire us using the older versions or alternatives or we will find someone else who will.

    Photoshop Elements is a good alternative and I am about to buy Corel’s newest version of paintshop pro x6. After all, they have been in this game for awhile and this is a big opportunity for another “player”.

    Just a thought…